Ten or One Million

The journey of a teenage musician

It’s 2006, and a six-year-old girl holds a stick as a microphone, singing the lyrics of a song by Bon Jovi from before she was born. The adults around her laugh- little do they know that her love for music would just grow stronger.

Cameron Cox is sixteen now, sitting in the Piano Room of her house, looking back at the video. “I would dance around my room and sing songs I just made up a minute ago, about being a princess and other embarrassing things,” she says. “I swear my music has gotten better over time.”

This song, along with her others, is a lot of work to put together. Professional artists have producers that edit tracks and add music after songwriters help figure out the perfect note and words, but Cameron does the entire process from her bedroom in Vermont.

Sitting at the keyboard, she plays a song she recently wrote: “I taught myself a few years ago,” she said. “It was like I had to so I could make the notes that would play together in my head.”

A piece of paper sitting next to her has the lyrics of a song about loving someone and being afraid of them leaving: ‘could you hold my hand? I swear that I am trying.’

She came up with the lyrics in the shower, running out with dripping hair and yelling “give me paper!” while wrapped in a towel.

With just a few hours between school and sleep, there is little time for Cameron to focus on her passion.

“It’s hard, I hardly have enough energy to walk, let alone sing and write,” she said, “but it’s so important to me.”

“I feel like if I don’t do this then I won’t be anyone,” she explains, “because I can only see myself as someone who speaks to people through music.”

Her music has a little bit of every genre and feeling all mixed together. “I want to make every person feel every emotion I can,” Cameron says.  “I don’t want to be someone who plays the same thing over and over.”

Now, she is working on a brand new song in U-32’s Studio Music room, preparing to add the music onto her very own EP at the end of the year.

“I don’t care if it reaches ten or one million people, as long as someone listens to it and feels something.” she smiles. “That’s all I want.”