Pow!: The Green Mountain Comic Expo

The flash of a camera goes off, emitting to the right of the entrance. A large green screen is set up by the CW Network, letting attendees take pictures with characters like The Flash and Green Arrow. Across the path, a bakery is selling items such as Rice Crispy treats, cupcakes and cookies for $3 a piece.

The Green Mountain Comic Expo was in full swing with costumed attendees wandering booths representing vendors selling products in science fiction, fantasy, anime and video games.

In one booth, Mike Luoma, a science fiction and comic book writer, sat down and presented passers-by with comic titles such as Red Hot and Alibi Jones.

“I’ve been writing my whole life and drawing my whole life, and didn’t really put the two together until twelve years ago,” Mike said.

      

Luoma started writing comics back in 2006 when he wrote Holy Shit: Pat Robertson is the Anti-Christ and published it on his website.

“A lot of people said ‘Well the art is a little iffy’ and then I just started working with other artists. I write and do the lettering.”

Luoma ended up working with Argentinian art teacher Carlos Quattordio on some of his titles. “He had a student come in and say he wanted to work with an American writer, and [Quattordio] sent him to me, ” Mike said.

One of his novel series, Vatican Assassin is an adventure story about “’BC’ – Bernard Campion – from hit man for the Pope to the heights of human power – from holy killer to champion of all humanity. . . Kinda.” The summary states on his website. “In Vatican Assassin, it’s 2109 and BC poses as a priest – But he’s really an assassin for the New catholic Church. His assignment: assassinate Meredith McEntyre, Governor of Lunar Prime, the non-aligned city-state on the Moon.

Pat Lanker grew up on baseball cards and twenty-five cent comics. With his father coming home everyday and giving his son a new story about heroes and adventure.

“Having dealt with sports cards and comics, there’s a difference between the two,” Pat said while shuffling a deck of baseball cards.

“The comic book people, they want it and if they see something they like and in the ballpark of their price, they will get it. With baseball people, if you ask fifty, they want five. It’s a whole different monster.”

Back in 2014, the first Vermont Comic Con was held in a hotel lobby in Burlington. Since then, a second convention has been added to the schedule, which took place on the 14th and 15th of April, 2018.

“I’m hoping we stick to two conventions per year,” said Pat Lanker, an at home comic salesman while surrounded by white boxes filled it’s comics, issues sealed in clear plastic.

“When you go to the bigger shows, their basically once a year, and Vermont is such a small state, and trying to spread it, it won’t be such a good idea.”

The Vermont Comic Book Conventions seem to be growing more and more popular at an accelerating rate. Vermont Horror Con and the main Vermont Comic Con are happening later this year in both the summer and the fall as proof of the growth.

More creators and vendors from across the state are able to take advantage of the gathering, showing off their work and efforts in front of audiences.

“Believe in yourself, because you can do this,” said Mike Luoma about writing comics.

“Anybody can do this if you put your mind to it and you focus your energy, have a certain optimism about it and a little bit of stubbornness. It’s a question of belief. Don’t let people talk you out of it.”

Pat Lanker grew up on baseball cards and twenty-five cent comics. With his father coming home everyday and giving his son a new story about heroes and adventure.

“Having dealt with sports cards and comics, there’s a difference between the two,” Pat said while shuffling a deck of baseball cards,

“The comic book people, they want it and if they see something they like and in the ballpark of their price, they will get it. With baseball people, if you ask fifty, they want five. It’s a whole different monster.”

Back in 2014, the first Vermont Comic Con was held in a hotel lobby in Burlington. Since then, a second convention has been added to the schedule, which took place on the 14th and 15th of April, 2018.

“I’m hoping we stick to two conventions per year.” Pat Lanker, an at home comic salesman said while surrounded by white boxes filled it’s comics, issues sealed in clear plastic.

“When you go to the bigger shows, their basically once a year, and Vermont is such a small state, and trying to spread it, it won’t be such a good idea.”

The  Vermont Comic Book Conventions seem to be growing more and more popular at an accelerating rate. Vermont Horror Con and the main Vermont Comic Con Are happening later this year in both the summer and the fall as proof of the growth.

More creators and vendors from across the state are able to take advantage of the gathering, showing off their work and efforts in front of audiences.

“Believe in yourself, because you can do this.” Mike Luoma said about writing comics.

“Anybody can do this if you put your mind to it and you focus your energy, have a certain optimism about it and a little bit of stubbornness. It’s a question of belief. Don’t let people talk you out of it.”