Krista Dy

Krista Dy’s future in art was set in high school. “I didn’t think I could draw very well, but I took a class. I think it was Junior year. The first assignment was to make a portrait and it ended up that I could draw pretty well.”

We are all so used to being taught art from art teachers that we sometimes don’t think about the art the teachers make themselves. For an art teacher it’s important to be well skilled in many different types of art, and Krista has been broadening her mediums for years. “Over the years I have worked in many many mediums of art, I started out in painting and drawing, my undergrad is in sculpture, I worked with public art for quite a while, and now I’m working in darkroom black and white film.”

Krista Dy has a unique teaching style from other teachers, even other art teachers. “I have painting, and I’ve taken it twice, second time around I’m allowed to do what I want with the curriculum,” said Cameron Roy, a student in her class. “She more than teaches, she encourages, she tells you how to make your paintings fit your vision and encourages you to be creative and have fun with it rather than stress on perfection.”

“I find her pretty cool.” Says another one of Krista’s students Olivia bates, “I feel like she is a more open teacher and that helps students be more creative and have more freedom with their ideas.”

More recently she has been working with photography, a slightly controversial medium as some people believe it isn’t real art. “I’m trying to figure out what it means to me that a photograph is art, not just a photograph.” Krista says.  Krista believes there is a line that divides art from just a simple photograph. “It’s about bringing out a response or emotion rather than just taking a picture of something.”

Krista’s Dy’s art has been quite personal, about her life, her passions and even about her son. “I made a video back in the day, about my son, and it was about what it’s like to grow up as a boy without a father.” Krista said.

As Krista says in her artist description, she is “constantly navigating through the discomfort and pleasure of being human.”

 

Here’s a few of Krista’s recent pieces: